Raytheon-Boeing Team Goes 3 for 3 During Government-Funded JAGM Testing

On 23 September Raytheon and Boeing announced that they have completed the final of three government-sponsored firings of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile. During the Sept. 3 test, the JAGM used its millimeter wave radar guidance system to hit a moving target at 6 kilometers (3.75 miles).

1st Oct 2010


On 23 September Raytheon and Boeing announced that they have completed the final of three government-sponsored firings of the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile. During the Sept. 3 test, the JAGM used its millimeter wave radar guidance system to hit a moving target at 6 kilometers (3.75 miles).


The Raytheon-Boeing JAGM features a fully integrated tri-mode seeker that incorporates semiactive laser, uncooled imaging infrared and millimeter wave guidance. The weapon leverages proven components from other Raytheon and Boeing programs, such as the Raytheon GBU-53/B Small Diameter Bomb II and the Boeing Brimstone.


"In 2008, JAGM contractors promised the U.S. government they would successfully demonstrate three working JAGM prototypes within 24 months; I'm proud to say the Raytheon-Boeing team has lived up to its end of the bargain," said Bob Francois, Raytheon vice president of Advanced Missiles and Unmanned Systems. "One of the key reasons all our tests were successful is because we kept it simple and focused on the affordability of the design."


This test marks the last major event of the technology demonstration phase of the JAGM program.


"We look forward to submitting our engineering manufacturing development proposal because we have proven during rigorous testing that the Raytheon-Boeing JAGM solution meets the warfighters' requirements," said Carl Avila, director of Boeing Advanced Weapons and Missile Systems. "Team Raytheon-Boeing has fired JAGM five times in 24 months, proving once again that we can meet our commitments. We applaud the government for its efforts to incorporate a prototyping phase into the competition; it's a win for the government, industry and ultimately the warfighter."


The team conducted two successful company-funded JAGM tests in April 2010, a government-funded test in June and another in August. During the most recent test, all three guidance systems operated simultaneously and provided telemetry data that enabled engineers to conduct further analysis of the weapon.
JAGM, designed to replace three legacy systems, offers the warfighter improved lethality, range, operational flexibility, supportability and cost savings compared with older weapons like the Hellfire missile.
 

Defence Review Asia at a glance